HR PEO Blog

Labor Laws/ Compliance

Dealing with personnel files can be a daunting, yet rewarding task. Having all documents together in the event of an audit or worse, a lawsuit, could save your company costly fines and mounds of legal trouble down the road. This chart will offer a brief explanation of what items need to be kept and for how long.*

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) electronic submission deadline is rapidly approaching. Are you ready?

This is the first year certain employers must electronically submit their OSHA injury and illness data for posting on the OSHA website. Prior to this, little to no data was made public about worker injuries and illnesses. OSHA is hoping that by making this information available, employers will be encouraged to focus on safety for their employees.

Wednesday, 09 August 2017 09:44

It’s the Little Things that Count

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These days it seems like it’s getting harder and harder to compete with all the flourish and flair many start-ups and tech companies offer. Take Google, for example; they offer their employees things like gourmet cafeterias, video games, nap pods, massage rooms, and rock climbing walls all for free. Employees can even do their laundry at work for free. They can get a haircut for free. They can start a friendly volleyball game during work hours if they wanted to; they just need to head down to the volleyball courts.

The FMLA can be a complicated regulation for employers to decode. If you have tried to sort through it but still have questions, don’t worry. As a Colorado PEO, StaffScapes has helped dozens of companies navigate successfully through FMLA issues.

General industry employers now have a new OSHA rule to follow regarding walking-working surfaces and fall protection standards.  This rule covers all general industry employers which are employers that are not in agriculture, construction or maritime. The rule updates standards and adds training and inspection requirements to slip, trip and fall hazards as well as adding a new section for personal protection standards requiring employers to use specific personal fall protection systems. Employers will be required to protect workers from fall hazards that are at least 4 feet above a lower level and sets requirements for fall protection as well as ladder safety.  Employers will be benefited under this rule by having a choice of a range of specific fall protection options.

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